Six Reasons Why I Love Jazz by Ronan Guilfoyle

I was recently reading all the hype about the new Gatsby film, and reading so much rubbish, (at least in the Irish papers), being written by journalists about the ‘Jazz Age’ - journalists who have NO idea what they’re talking about, bar what they read in Wikipedia. And this got me thinking about how while there's all this fuss and hyperbole being written about the ‘Jazz Age’, the music itself struggles so h...

26 Nov 5:04 PM 0 Read More...

Editor’s Picks: 5 Essential Jazz Albums- Bitches Brew

I saved my favorite jazz album by my favorite jazz artist for last: Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew. Duke Ellington referred to Davis as “The Picasso of jazz”, and I wholeheartedly agree. No single artist has done more to revolutionize jazz music than Miles. He was a pioneer in the true sense of the word; an innovative genius, never content with finding and developing just one sound, always pushing the boundaries and...

25 Nov 3:06 PM 0 Read More...

Editor’s Picks: 5 Essential Jazz Albums- Headhunters

I wouldn’t be able to talk essential jazz albums without paying any attention to my favorite subgenre: jazz fusion. There are many different types of jazz fusion, but it’s generally seen as jazz that’s been “fused” with some other guitar-based genre - most often psychedelic rock or funk music. Herbie Hancock, regarded as a key player in the jazz fusion movement, composed his landmark album Headhunters in 19...

25 Nov 12:02 AM 0 Read More...

Editor’s Picks: 5 Essential Jazz Albums- Karma

If Charles Mingus and John Coltrane perfected two opposite ends of the jazz spectrum (immaculate structure on one, impeccable free improvisation on the other) then Pharoah Sanders unified and refined each of those aspects on his 1969 album Karma. Sanders, who was given the nickname “Pharoah” by none other than avant-garde jazz legend Sun Ra, was introduced to spiritual jazz when he started sitting in with Coltran...

23 Nov 2:34 AM 0 Read More...

Editor's Picks: 5 Essential Jazz Albums- The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady

Charles Mingus’ 1963 masterpiece The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady is, like A Love Supreme, a groundbreaking and essential avant garde jazz album. The albums are also similar in that they both have interesting liner notes; Mingus recruited his psychotherapist, Dr. Edmund Pollack, to contribute a bit of writing on the album to be included there. Unlike Coltrane’s record, however, Mingus’ efforts were not as fo...

22 Nov 3:45 PM 0 Read More...